Just Because You Don’t Think It’s a Big Deal, It’s a Big Deal

“Just because you don’t think it’s a big deal doesn’t mean your customer doesn’t think it’s a big deal. When your customer says it’s a big deal, it’s a big deal. And even when your customer says “It’s no big deal,” it’s still a big deal. Or why would they bring it up?” – Kristin Anderson, Performance Research Associates

Last night I was shopping in the local vitamin shop when I overheard a customer tell the cashier, “I think someone just left their credit card.” The cashier says, “It might be that woman’s,” and points to the lady outside just about to get into her car. It was very obvious the cashier wasn’t going to do anything else so the customer took the card and practically ran out to ask. It wasn’t hers. The customer brought it back, left it on the counter and went about shopping in the store. The card was still on the counter when he went back with his purchase. The customer picked it up and placed it behind the counter. The cashier just left it there. He didn’t stick in the register. He didn’t give it to the manager. Nothing.

That cashier didn’t get it. To that cashier, it was simply a piece of plastic. To him, no big deal. To us, as customers, credit cards are unbelievably valuable. If we ever misplace a credit card, let alone lose one, we panic. To us, it’s a BIG deal.

As a customer, you know that we don’t buy from companies; we still buy from people. And we buy from people we know, like and trust. In just reading about what happened, you see as I see, as a customer, that the cashier is the store. And that one act that he does not think was at all important to him is the snapshot we take of that business. To the customer who found it, to the customer who hopefully will claim her card and to me, we are all questioning the trust we can have for that store. And that mental snapshot stays with us until another snapshot of that business replaces it. In fact, for some customers, it may take a motion picture worth of positive impressions before that one snapshot is deleted. It takes 12 positive service incidents to make up for one negative incident. And some customers who have a bad experience may never give a business a second chance, opting simply to walk away, intent on never coming back.

Now put on your customer service hat. When you serve customers remember, “To the customer, YOU are the company”. If you are a customer service manager, reinforce to your team that each interaction with a single customer represents all of you as a business. Every act of any one individual is a customer’s snapshot of your company’s likability and trust. And every act, no matter how small, is a big deal.

5 Comments

Filed under Customer Loyalty, Customer Satisfaction, Training

5 responses to “Just Because You Don’t Think It’s a Big Deal, It’s a Big Deal

  1. Alba

    It is very bad that some businesses have employees like that, but unfortunately I see it all that time when I am a customer.

    • I agree. It’s amazing to me how much companies spend on advertising for new customers when they would be better off spending that money in training to keep the customers they have.

  2. Thanks for this great post! You hit on a very key component of customer engagement that eludes a lot of great organizations. How do you get everyone on board, even the front line cashier who is only in the store 15 hours a week, to truly be an ambassador for the company and brand? We see so much apathy in the work place today. Apathy can only be combatted by a positive emotional engagement with the job, company and brand. I would venture a guess that the employee engagement levels at this organization are low, which is common in this economy. The good news is the key managers can turn that apathy around with some focused training. And you are so right, so many things that are not a big deal to the associate/employee are a very big deal to the customer.

    • Tina, You are absolutely right. While many companies provide periodic product training, they do not offer customer service training. Yet it is more likely that someone will not return because of how they were treated more often than other reason. My solution is a three word leadership strategy: 1. Connect with employees, as you mention, with emotional engagement 2. Inspire a shared vision and 3. Empower your employees with the ability to take care of the customers. As I am sure you know, once is not enough. Any customer service training needs to be reinforced periodically to make it stick. Thank you for sharing. Great insight!

  3. Interesting story. Goes to show the importance of selecting for conscientiousness in customer-facing positions.

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